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education


education / community

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education


education / community

Torres-Vives is a professor at Arizona State University's (ASU) Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts; where he teaches film directing and production. As a faculty member at the School of Transborder Studies at ASU, he also teaches media production with a focus on the "transborder region".

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

School of Transborder Studies.

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education 2


As part of his continuing work with multiple communities, Torres-Vives has taught film and photography to incarcerated youth in Los Angeles, homeless LGBTQ youth, immigrants, and gang-related men, among others. From 1998-2004, Torres-Vives was the Executive Director of a non-profit video/photo production company, overseeing production teams on multiple short videos and long form projects for community organizations and private companies; including U.S. Bancorp, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the San Diego Mayor’s Arts Committee; where he led all phases of program, financial, and organizational development. This community work was recognized with multiple awards from National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the California Arts Council, and the San Diego commission for Arts and Culture; as well as multiple museum and gallery exhibitions (full list available).

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voices behind the wall

Photos and spoken-word from incarcerated youth

SPARC Gallery, Venice, California   2012

 

education 3


voices behind the wall

Photos and spoken-word from incarcerated youth

SPARC Gallery, Venice, California   2012

 

Gallery view of exhibit:  SPARC Gallery in Venice, California from June 22, 2012-September 20, 2012

In the two years of teaching and collaborating with young men at Probation Camp David Gonzales we have used photography and technology to examine and reimagine the world around them. In bi-weekly classes we learn about cameras and computers, but more importantly we use creativity and trust to visualize what is possible.  The images and words become a New Road; where we can access technology, visual literacy, sincere conversation and the hands-on joy of creating. Although my time working with these young men is sometimes short, I am constantly impressed by their resilience; as they reshape an image, rewrite a letter or recount the complex struggles that led them to our small classroom behind the wall.